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AOD workers' portal
 
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Key references

References for the key publications about the use of pharmaceutical drugs among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples are listed here.

2013

Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (2013)

Alcohol and other drug treatment services in Australia 2011-12.

Canberra: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare

This report presents data on alcohol and other drug treatment agencies and the episodes of treatment provided in Australia for 2011-2012. Alcohol was the most common principal drug of concern, accounting for almost half of these closed episodes, and counselling was the most common type of treatment. The report shows that Indigenous Australians were more likely to use alcohol, cannabis and amphetamines than non-Indigenous Australians, although Indigenous Australians were more likely to abstain from alcohol than non-Indigenous Australians. Data for Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians is presented throughout the report.

Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet abstract

Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (2013)

National opioid pharmacotherapy statistics annual data collection: 2012.

Canberra: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare

Stafford J, Burns L (2013)

Australian drug trends 2012. Findings from the Illicit Drug Reporting System (IDRS).

Sydney: National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre

2012

Demirkol A (2012)

Benzodiazepines.

In: Lee K, Freeburn B, Ella S, Miller W, Perry J, Conigrave K, eds. Handbook for Aboriginal alcohol and drug work. Sydney: University of Sydney: 173-184

This chapter is from the Handbook for Aboriginal alcohol and drug work and provides information for alcohol and other drug (AOD) workers on benzodiazepines, including:

  • benzodiazepine use among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people
  • why people misuse benzodiazepines
  • benzodiazepines' effects on the body
  • how to recognise benzodiazepine dependence
  • how to recognise benzodiazepine withdrawal
  • how to assess a client who uses benzodiazepines
  • how to help a person who misuses benzodiazepines
  • stimulant overdose
  • reducing the harms related to benzodiazepine use if a person cannot or will not quit
  • preventing benzodiazepine use.

Abstract adapted from the University of Sydney

 
Last updated: 24 July 2014
 
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Australia's National Research Centre on AOD Workforce Development National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre National Drug Research Institute